Spring 2013 Courses


Spring 2013 Global Studies Course Listing

Click the links to be directed.

I. Core Courses
II. Electives offered through Global Studies Program
III. Collaborative Research Seminars
IV. Directed Research Seminar
VI. Global Engagement
VI. Relevant Courses Offered through Other Departments

I. Core Courses

UGLB 2110A – (Dis) Order and (In)Justice: Introduction to Global Studies
Dechen Albero
Tuesday – 7:00 – 9:40PM

This class serves as an introduction to Global Studies. The focus is on the tension between order and justice as it plays out across the contemporary world, from war to migration, to the changing roles of the state, international institutions, transnational actors, and citizens. A governing metaphor for the class is the “border” and the ways in which it creates order and disorder in the modern system of states. We will examine the creation of the borders of countries, but also the borders between the local and the global, the legal and illegal, the licit and the illicit, self and other. These borders have intertwined histories, structures, and logics that we shall explore together. In particular we will seek to understand order as a dynamic relationship between territory, identity and belonging, and justice as a question of responsibility and ethics at the collective and personal level in an intimate relationship to forms of order. In other words, how did we get to where we are today, and what should— and can—we do about it? We will explore these topics through “global” perspective with an interdisciplinary focus, emphasizing the interconnectedness between global and local spaces and the impact of global issues on the real human lives that are inevitably at the center of our investigations. (3 credits) CRN 6429

UGLB 2110B – (Dis) Order and (In)Justice: Introduction to Global Studies
Aleksandra Wagner
Monday and Wednesday – 2:00 – 3:15PM

See above. (3 credits) CRN 7283

UGLB 2111 – Understanding Global Capitalism
David Gold
Wednesday – 12:10 – 2:40PM

This course provides an overview of the history, theories and institutions of the contemporary world economy, the workings of which constitutes essential background information for any student interested in understanding globalization. The focus will be on how things are made and how they move: the globalization of production (international trade and investment and migration) and the globalization of finance (international capital flows, the balance of payments and exchange rates). Underpinning these concepts are theories of market integration, transnational corporations, the politics governing the global economy, and their relation to innovation, economic growth, inequality and development. The course will be built around case studies and student projects, but will also involve a survey of fundamental principles of international economics. (4 credits) CRN 6404

 
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II. Electives Offered Through Global Studies Program

Note: These electives are offered through the Global Studies Program. Students may also take course through other departments at the University and count these courses towards their elective requirements! See section 4 below.

 

Knowledge Base Electives:

UGLB 2210 Governing the Global
Alexandra Delano
Tuesday and Thursday – 11:55AM – 1:35PM

Who “governs” the global and in whose interests? Can international institutions and organizations like the United Nations or the World Bank make global governance work? Are alternatives necessary for possible? This course examines the actors that participate in global governance from two perspectives. First, we study the historical development, goals, and performance of international organizations and the regimes and norms upon which they are based. Second we look at global civil society and how it adapts and participates in changing practices and conceptions of citizenship, sovereignty and identity in a globalized world. The course, organized as a seminar, will provide a rich conceptual framework and examine case studies on issues such as human rights, labor migration, refugees, trade and finance, human security and regional integration. Students will become familiar with scholarly and policy debates on global governance, drawing from academic readings in International Relations and Political science, as well as primary source documents, news articles, documentaries, films, podcasts and other sources. A final research project will provide students the opportunity to explore select issues in depth, focusing on the connections between the local and the global. (4 credits) CRN 7531

UGLB 3214 Global Justice (same as NPOL 3310)
Karsten Struhl
Wednesday – 8:00 – 9:50PM

From Plato to John Rawls, classical political theory regards arguments concerning justice as moral disagreements about the internal organization of a nation- (or city-) state. In the age of globalization, however, there is an increasing recognition not only that decisions made within one national entity often have effects that transcend its boundaries but also that the actions of transnational agents like corporations and international financial and trade institutions significantly affect the living conditions of people throughout the world. There is an emerging global institutional order whose rules are coming under increasing scrutiny and moral criticism. After a brief introduction to the classical problem of justice, this course focuses on contemporary interpretations of the concept of global justice. We examine the relation of these interpretations to different assessments and theories of globalization. We also look at the debates about global justice from the perspective of the struggles for alternative forms of globalization. (3 credits) CRN 7529

 

Cluster 1 Electives: People, Places, Encounters (PPE)

UGLB 3325 (same as NANT 3633) Whose Heritage?
Jennifer Scott
Wednesday – 3:50 – 6:30PM

What do “culture” and “heritage” mean to those who produce it and for those who consume it? How can sites, objects, and their histories simultaneously “belong” to a local community, a nation, and all humanity? How do culturally specific museums operate in a global context; how do mainstream museums address diversity? In this course, students will examine the worldwide phenomenon of culture and heritage from an anthropological perspective, each week, pairing specific cultural sites with questions central to anthropological theory. In the first half of the course, we focus on museums and landmarks in New York City such as the American Museum of Natural History, the National Museum of the American Indian, Ellis Island, the Museum of Chinese in the Americas, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Weeksville Heritage Center. We then broaden our view to consider the meaning of “World Heritage” and “Universal Value” as defined by Unesco’s World Heritage Center. We examine World Heritage sites including: the Mayan city of Chichen-Itza in Mexico, Khmer temples of Angkor in Cambodia, Ghana’s El Mina Slave Fort, and Pharaonic and Islamic monuments in Egypt. Through case studies, we link the local to the global exploring: the role of public memory; the representation of racial, ethnic, religious and sexual identities; archaeology’s role in constructing national identity; indigenous ownership of material culture; performance theory in historical re-enactment; symbolism and iconography in site marking; and the marking of tragic histories such as slavery and war. Site visits will be planned throughout the semester. (3 credits) CRN 7555

UGLB 4315 (same as NINT 5370) Gender and the Middle East
Nargis Virani
Wednesday – 8:00-9:50PM

NOTE: This is a graduate-level course offered in collaboration with the Graduate Program in International Affairs. Students should have completed at least 60 credits with a B or better to register for this course. Contact Dechen Albero at alberod@newschool.edu for permission to register for this course or with questions.

In this course, students explore how knowledge about women and men in the Middle East has been produced and how gender inflects aspects of social, political, and economic life. Beginning from the colonial encounter and Western approaches, the course covers gendered aspects of religion, colonialism, anti-colonial struggles, feminism, revolution, marriage and family law, citizenship, expressive culture (literature, art, music), and conflict. Geographically the course ranges from North Africa to the Gulf, Turkey, Israel/Palestine, and Iran and draws on sources in literature, anthropology, history, and politics. This semester, a media focus will closely track the role of gender in the ongoing historic changes taking place in the region. (3 credits) CRN 7533

UGLB 4316 (same as NINT 5208) India and China Interactions
Lily Ling
Wednesday – 8:00 – 9:50PM

NOTE: This is a graduate-level course offered in collaboration with the Graduate Program in International Affairs. Students should have completed at least 60 credits with a B or better to register for this course. Contact Dechen Albero at alberod@newschool.edu for permission to register for this course or with questions.

This course is designed for students interested in Sino-Indian interactions. We will cover the historical and contemporary exchanges between India and China given their dramatically different cultural, political, and historical experiences. We aim not only to understand the uniqueness of the connections between India and China, but also how these two civilizations have contributed to global exchanges and flows. The course will highlight similarities and differences between the two societies, their mutual perceptions, cultural exchanges and influences, patterns of development, causes of conflict as well as possibilities for cooperation, and their role in world history and the contemporary global economy. Besides academic articles and books, we will also discuss films and documentaries on these two nations and their interactions. (3 credits) CRN 7534

 

Cluster 2 Electives: Markets and States (MS)

UGLB 3406 Africa, Development and Diaspora
Monica Fagioli
Monday and Wednesday – 10:00 – 11:40AM

Today an unprecedented convergence between development, migration and diasporas is redefining migration policies internationally and affecting the relationship between the diasporas and their states. This seminar offers a critical approach to the study of migration and development using the case of Africa, especially drawing on current examples from the Horn of Africa, with a special focus on the relationship between diaspora and state-building in Somalia. A specific focus of this class will be on the recent shift in policy among many international organizations—such as the International Organization for Migration, the United Nations Development Program, and the World Bank—towards recruiting from the African diaspora when implementing development projects. This course will address several key issues related to transnational citizenship and development, including the different roles of African migrants upon return to their home countries and the effect of economic, social and political relationships between Africans and the African diaspora on the functioning of the state in Africa. Readings will include anthropological texts that explore different development practices across the African continent; international relations and political science articles detailing the history and impact of global migration policies; and critical examinations of the current processes of state building drawing from primary and secondary sources. (4 credits) CRN 7279

UGLB 4450 (same as NINT 5414) Economic Crisis and its Global Consequences
Richard Wolff
Monday – 4:00 – 5:50PM

NOTE: This is a graduate-level course offered in collaboration with the Graduate Program in International Affairs. Students should have completed at least 60 credits with a B or better to register for this course. Contact Dechen Albero at alberod@newschool.edu for permission to register for this course or with questions.

This course focuses on why the global economic crisis since 2007 is lasting so long and cutting so deep, why bailouts of major financial markets and enterprises failed to end it, and why austerity has become the major government policy to address it. We will also contrast the consequences for different parts of the world economy of the crisis, the bailouts, and austerity. Finally, we will examine alternative policies, how they would have affected the global economy differently, and why they have not yet been applied.(3 credits) CRN 7851

 

Cluster 3 Electives: Rights, Justice, Governance (RJG)

UGLB 3512 Present Pasts: Global Memory Politics
Ben Nienass
Tuesday and Thursday – 3:50 – 5:30PM

The past is both a resource for and the subject of political struggles. Attempts to do justice to the past and to create commonly shared narratives of past events are at the heart of politics. Memory politics was part of the agenda of building the nation-state. From the 19th century on, historians busied themselves writing stories of the travails and triumphs of their nation, while at the same time states created rituals and monuments celebrating largely imaginary pasts (Hobsbawm called this ‘the invention of tradition’). The creation of memory was the conscious policy of almost all states. A common historical narrative was not merely an instrument of social control; it was also a source of solidarity and legitimacy.

The nation-state remains an important arena for memory politics. However, in the globalized world of the 21st century, new memory dynamics are coming into play. Diasporic communities maintain the memories of their past homeland, whilst emerging transnational bodies such as the European Union attempt to discover or create memories, appropriate to new political agendas. At the same time, globalized media turn certain events (9/11, the assassination of JFK, the invasion of Iraq) into near universal memories.

This course will begin with an introduction to the key theoretical debates. It will then trace these transnational processes from post-war Europe, through the Cold War to the ‘memory boom’ of the 90s with its focus on transitional justice, and finally to current debates on human rights, extradition, and reparations. We will also look at specific memory debates pertaining to New York (e.g. the WTC memorial) and how these are embedded in transnational processes. How do all of these developments challenge the earlier symbiosis between memory and the nation-state? How does the politics of memory contribute to notions of international justice and human rights? How does an emerging common symbolism link polities across the globe? Students will be encouraged to undertake an independent research project on the politics of memory. This course is recommended for those interested in participating in the Rwanda summer 2013 program. (4 credits) CRN 6943

UGLB 3520 (same as NFDS 3210) Global Food Crisis
Jessica Wurwarg
Monday – 8:00 – 9:50PM

What is hunger, and how has our perception of it evolved? What is required to be food secure, and is food a human right? What constitutes a food crisis? Is there currently one or are there many? Explore the root causes and potential solutions to hunger and food crises, and through this perspective, examine international food policy and its role in international development. This course includes a study of sustainable food security; the economic, social and environmental sustainability of possible solutions; and the maintenance of food security. The course also explores the role of water and the impact of water scarcity on the future of food production. It will examine through research and class discussions the possibility of improving food security and food aid. Case studies may include Latin America (Haiti, Brazil), Africa (Kenya, Mali), and Asia (India). (3 credits) CRN 7389

UGLB 3530 (same as LSOC 3041) Citizenship: A Socio-Political and Historical Survey
Carlos Forment
Monday and Wednesday – 10:00 – 11:40AM

The very meaning of the term, citizenship, like so many other socio-political concepts that are central to
modern democracy, has been construed differently over time by writers identified with alternative
political traditions. The aim of this course is to examine both the historical trajectories and divergent
interpretations of citizenship, and how they have shaped each other. Although we will examine some of
the formal elements that have been attributed to the notion of citizenship (individual and collective rights;
civic universalism; ethnic particularism; negative and positive liberty, etc.), the course focuses primarily
on the changing relationship between alternative forms of citizenship and democratic life in the
contemporary period. A large portion of the readings are case studies from different parts of the world
that are experiencing neoliberal globalization. (4 credits) CRN 7889

UGLB 4512 (same as NINT 5278) Human Rights and Transitional Justice
Louis Bickford
Monday – 8:00 – 9:50PM

NOTE: This is a graduate-level course offered in collaboration with the Graduate Program in International Affairs. Students should have completed at least 60 credits with a B or better to register for this course. Contact Dechen Albero at alberod@newschool.edu for permission to register for this course or with questions.

Should societies confront the legacies of past human rights abuse or atrocity? If so, how? What policy options are open to successor regimes during a post-transition or post-conflict period? How do these policy options relate to broader goals, such as peace, stability, or democracy? This course seeks to answer these questions. This course begins with an exploration of why, or even if, societies should confront past human rights abuse and atrocity. Drawing on film and literature, as well as accounts by victims and arguments by victim movements, the course examines arguments about justice and democracy-building that have been advanced to support the field of transitional justice. The course then examines the main strategies that have emerged for an engagement with the past. These include (1) prosecuting the offenders, from Germany’s Adolf Eichmann, to Chile’s General Pinochet, to Iraq’s Saddam Hussein, including through international tribunals or “hybrid” (mixed) tribunals such as the Khmer Rouge Tribunal in Cambodia; (2) developing truth commissions (such as in Chile, South Africa, Peru, and Sierra Leone), or other (e.g. non-official) forms of truth-telling; (3) establishing reparations programs (including the possibility of reparations for slavery in the USA); (4) launching of larger-scale institutional reforms (such as police reform or security sector reform in countries such as Northern Ireland, East Germany, and Iraq); and (5) the building of memorials and recapturing public spaces to create social dialogue (in Argentina, Cambodia, East Timor). The theme of “reconciliation” will also be discussed throughout the course. (3 credits) CRN 7512

 

Cluster 4 Electives: Urban, Media, Environment (UME)

UGLB 3613 (same as LURB 3077) Dwelling in Dilemma – Chinese Middle Class and Cities
Lei Peng
Monday and Wednesday – 11:55 – 1:35PM

Radical urbanization has now become one of the most concerned cultural-political terms in contemporary post-socialist China. It is time to study the politics of the emergence of the Chinese middle class as well as the disappearance of once well preserved urban spaces by critically investigating the intertwined processes of privatization, urbanization and globalization. In this context, this course will center on some of the crucial questions such as how to understand the violence of massive demolition of urban spaces in relation to the irony of the Chinese Property Rights Law, how to reflect on the plight of the Chinese middle class and their blind pursuit of homeownership dreams, and how to interpret the particular class condition and its political weakness. Therefore by introducing some of the seminal and primary texts on modern Chinese history, cinema and urban studies, this course will allow us to rethink the impact of Chinese hyper urbanism as well as the changing social, class and spatial distinctions in the era of global capitalism. (4 credits) CRN 7539

UGLB 4611 (same as NINT 5171) Hollywood and the World
Nina Khrushcheva
Thursday – 6:00-7:50PM

NOTE: This is a graduate-level course offered in collaboration with the Graduate Program in International Affairs. Students should have completed at least 60 credits with a B or better to register for this course. Contact Dechen Albero at alberod@newschool.edu for permission to register for this course or with questions.

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the relationship between American cinema and world politics beginning with D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation in 1915. The principal purpose of the course is to understand Hollywood’s relationship with some of the broad themes of contemporary world politics such as nationalism, intelligence, conflict, globalization, colonization/decolonization, development/underdevelopment, security/insecurity, and, most profoundly, the politics of identity based on race, gender, and sexuality. We will examine each of these themes through the lens of the American film industry’s place in the global political economy. Using discussions, film screenings and class presentations, we will analyze the ways in which American cinema has represented and constructed both the world at large and the world around us. In these “journeys” through “Hollywood as American dream factory” we will be joined by Gladiator, Jason Bourne, Dr. Strangelove, and many others. (3 credits) CRN 7535

 
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III. Collaborative Research Seminars

Note: these are junior-level seminars intended for juniors and seniors. Majors must take at least one collaborative research seminar. Juniors or seniors may take additional seminars as electives. Open to all students but priority given to Global Studies majors. These seminars are limited to 12 students.

UGLB 3710 Skills for Global Change: Environmental Justice and Resource Conflicts
Mona Shomali
Mondays 3:50 – 6:30PM

This collaborative research seminar provides students with the opportunity to understand the challenges involved in trying to affect change in the realm of environmental justice and learn skills that are readily transferable to a diverse range of international humanitarian interventions and environmental projects. Unlike the typical “environmental” discourse, the focus of this course is environmental justice and social equity, with an emphasis on the affected marginalized populations that pay the heaviest price of pollution and degradation and are often left out of the Western agenda of environmentalism. This course will give students a unique skill set to answer the following question: how can I be an active participant towards a meaningful humanitarian impact or global paradigm shift? Students will examine a series of relevant case studies and projects such as: deforestation and indigenous human rights in the Amazon, water privatization and the “Law of Mother Earth” in Bolivia, petroleum wars in Africa and the Middle East, and food safety in India and California. Student will learn to critically understand, assess and analyzing such cases and work in teams to develop and design a campaign to raise awareness around an issue located in specific environmental and humanitarian “hot spots.”

Through practical exercises, group projects, site visits and mock simulations, students will learn essential techniques and tools that are used throughout international organizations and NGO’s, such as: development and design of a project framework; community and on-site assessments, how to conceptualize, outline and run advocacy campaign or field project, and advocacy writing (“action through writing”). Students will learn how and what to write for a targeted audience on behalf of a campaign whose goal it is to shift the public consciousness on a particularissue or change consumer attitudes and behaviors. This type of professional writing addresses stakeholders and is employed by practitioners as an agent for effective change in various professional contexts such as: campaign tool kits, press materials, policy analysis and recommendations. (4 credits) CRN 5678

UGLB 3714 Refugee Youth Experiences
Bernadette Ludwig
Monday 9:00 – 11:40AM

The U.S. resettles about 80,000 refugees annually of whom 35 to 40% are children. This collaborative research course introduces students to concepts related to forced migration with a focus on the experiences of refugee children. In the first part of the course we will read key texts which discuss the definition of refugee, refugee camp experiences, and the three permanent solutions for refugees outlined by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), with a particular emphasis on resettlement in third countries. Students will learn how the youth whom they will encounter in the service learning component of the class (see below) experience these transitions from being a resident of their country to becoming a refugee and then finding refuge in the U.S. Youth and their families are aided by Voluntary Agencies (Volags) to ease their transition to a new society. In the second part of the course we will discuss issues that are pertinent to refugee youth such as assimilation, acculturation, and the needs of Students with Interrupted Formal Education (SIFE). Ultimately the course will juxtapose theory and practice and by doing so, knowledge will be mutually reinforced and enriched.

This course is comprised of regular seminar meetings AND a substantial service learning component. Students will serve as tutors in the IRC’s Youth Program for a minimum of 3 hours per week throughout the semester. Students will have some options regarding their volunteer sites (boroughs, ages and ethnicities of the children to be tutored). In this capacity they will see the inner-workings of programs designed to aid refugee youth’s adjustment to their new environment and to succeed academically. Thus, they will be able to make connections between their experiences and observations and the theory/readings discussed in class. Given that students will work with youth all students have to undergo a background check administered by the IRC.

In collaborative research projects, students will create a guide for schoolteachers to help them understand and assist their refugee (and immigrant) students better. For this project students will draw on existing research and data. In addition, students will collect data on challenges faced by refugee youth through participant observation in the service learning component and through semi-structured interviews with key informants such as IRC staff/teachers and selective refugee youth. The guide/blog/report which the students will compile will include a theoretical section on forced migration and refugee resettlement and a practical part which will include suggestions on how to assist refugee children. Thus, the guide/blog/report will enable students to demonstrate their theoretical knowledge of issues related to refugees/immigrants as well as to demonstrate the knowledge which they have gained through volunteering with the IRC. (4 credits) CRN 7280

 
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IV. Directed Research Seminar

Note: This course is for Global Studies Seniors only. Please make sure to consult your advisor before registering.

UGLB 4710 Directed Research
Alexandra Delano
Thursday – 3:50 – 5:30PM

The main goal of this course is to guide students in the process of writing their thesis (or alternative research project) required for the major in Global Studies. The course builds on the research design that was developed in the Fall semester. The senior work is a major independent project that requires the best application of students’ analytical, writing, and research skills. We will work together to ensure that your project fulfills these requirements and that throughout the process of doing your research and writing you have a support network that includes the instructor and your peers, in addition to your thesis advisor.

This course will help you plan the writing of your thesis, it will provide strategies and feedback to help fluid your project through completion, and allow you to learn from your colleagues. Much like the first part of the course taught in the Fall, this second part is heavily interactive—we will work primarily with materials provided by you, the students, using the same model of presentations and peer review. By the end of the semester, students will finish writing their thesis and be able to present their work both orally and in writing. (1 credit) CRN 5676

 

V. Global Engagement

UGLB 3903 Global Engagement
Alexandra Delano and Dechen Albero
Internship / Externship

Global Studies majors who are planning to complete their global engagement requirement during the Spring semester must register for this course. Please contact Dechen Albero at alberod@newschool.edu for more information. (0 credits) CRN 7128

 
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VI. Relevant Courses Offered through Other Departments

Knowledge Base

LCST 2120 Intro to Cultural Studies
Jasmine Rault
Tuesday and Thursday – 10:15 – 11:30AM

This course examines the pivotal role of culture in the modern world, including the ideas, values, artifacts, and practices of people in their collective lives. Cultural Studies focuses on the importance of studying the material processes through which culture is constructed. It highlights process over product and rupture over continuity. In particular, it presents culture as a dynamic arena of social struggle and utopian possibility. Students read key thinkers and examine critical frameworks from a historical and a theoretical approach, such as Raymond Williams, Stuart Hall and the Birmingham School; the work on popular culture, identity politics, and postmodernism in America; and the emergence of a ‘global cultural studies’ in which transnational cultural flows are examined and assessed. Class sessions are set up as dialogic encounters between cultural theory and concrete analysis. (3 credits) CRN 7158

LHIS 2023 Power + Knowledge
Orit Halpern
Tuesday and Thursday – 1:50 – 3:30PM

This course will examine the relationship between science, technology, and society through a historical lens. Our main focus will be to expose how ideas of nature, culture, and the human have changed over time; and to interrogate the implications of these epistemological shifts. This historical inquiry will develop a critical approach to understanding complex socio technological systems in the present. Exploring topics such as eugenics, bio technology, and computing we will interrogate how historical study helps us politically and ethically engage with the most pressing contemporary questions concerning how we use, and imagine, our technical future. The course will pay particular attention to the historical construction of race, gender, sexuality, and to the transformations between human beings and machines. (4 credits) CRN 7171

LSOC 3036 State, Culture, Identity
Eiko Ikegami
Tuesday and Thursday – 3:50 – 5:05PM

This course examines the dynamic relationship between politics and culture. The central concern of this course is to explore, historically and comparatively, social processes in which various types of categorical identities are formulated and revised. Through a focus on concrete issues as diverse as the formation of ethnicity, national identities, bodily identities, and aesthetic tastes, this course investigates various ways of approaching how changes in large-scale social structures and the transformation of social categories are mutually related. Each student will do research on a concrete topic in sociology in the field of state, culture and identity. Course description: This course examines the dynamic relationship between politics and culture. The central concern of this course is to explore, historically and comparatively, social processes in which various types of categorical identities are formulated and revised. Through a focus on concrete issues as diverse as the formation of ethnicity, national identities, bodily identities, and aesthetic tastes, this course investigates various ways of approaching how changes in large-scale social structures and the transformation of social categories are mutually related. Each student will do research on a concrete topic in sociology in the field of state, culture and identity. (4 credits) CRN 7383

NCOM 3000 Intro to Media Studies
Peter Haratonik
Monday – 6:00 – 7:50PM

Students explore media history and the basic concepts employed in media analysis, spanning the history of technologies from the magic lantern to multimedia and stressing the relationship between media and their social, political, and economic contexts. Since media are at once technology, art, entertainment, and business enterprises, they need to be studied from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The readings for this course reflect this multifaceted approach and draw attention to the work of key thinkers and theorists in the field. Examples are drawn primarily from the visual media of commercial film, television, advertising, video, and the Internet, although alternative media practices are also noted. Students gain an understanding of how media texts are constructed, how they convey meaning, and how they shape each other in significant ways. (3 credits) CRN 1859

NECO 2002 Macroeconomics
Aviva Ancona
Online Course

This course introduces both theoretical and applied issues in macroeconomics, looking at the U.S. economy on the one hand and the global economy on the other. The course emphasizes theoretical controversies relevant to contemporary policy debates. Beginning with the key principles of modern economics, we examine major questions in macroeconomic policy, including measuring the gross domestic product, the possible connection between employment and inflation, the relationship between saving and investment, the effects and limitations of government monetary and fiscal policy, and business cycles. We also consider issues in the international political economy, such as trade policy and its relation to current account deficits and the role of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank in the international financial system. (3 credits) CRN 3571

NHUM 2035 Intro to Performance Studies
Ricardo Montez
Wednesday – 4:00 – 5:50PM

This course offers an overview of the interdisciplinary field of performance studies. From its origins in anthropological examinations of ritual to contemporary conversations about the performance of identity, performance studies has provided a new way to analyze art and the social world. In this course, we consider how primary performance terms—such as script, rehearsal, embodiment, and choreography—offer a rich conceptual framework for understanding the performance of everyday life. Exploring a wide range of performance practices and critical methodologies, the course is ideal for practitioners and scholars of art as well as students interested in cultural studies and media. Discussion topics include ritual in everyday life, language and performance, performance ethnography, liveness, activism and performance, the fetish as performative object, and the performance of race, gender, and sexuality. (3 credits) CRN 6805

NSOC 3102 Modern Social Theory
Robert Jurgen von Mahs
Time TBA

What holds societies together? When do they break down into conflict? What drives social change? Are there rules that govern human interaction? This course examines some of the Big Ideas about society, how those ideas came about, and how we can use them to understand concrete social problems. In the first part of the course, we look at how classical thinkers grappled with ideas about progress and social change: Adam Smith, Auguste Comte, and Herbert Spencer. In the second part, we focus on efforts by four seminal writers Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Georg Simmelto understand the development of capitalism and its implications for modern societies. Throughout the course, different theoretical traditions are presented as tool kits with which to examine historical and contemporary social issues. (3 credits) CRN 2905

NSOS 3800 Foundations of Gender Studies
Claire Potter
Wednesday – 4:00 – 5:50PM

What does it mean to think critically about gender and sexuality in a period of cultural instability? We examine the broad topics and controversies which, historically, have come to define “Women’s Studies,” and those that have contributed to the recent shift to the broader designation, “Gender Studies” especially in the social sciences and humanities. Important factors contributing to this shift are discussed — for example, the influx of gay, lesbian, and transgender studies, the impact of multicultural feminist thought, the rise of postmodernism and critiques of identity politics, and the emergence of “men’s studies.” We learn the critical framework for thinking about questions related to gender. Central to the course is an examination of personal narratives–memoirs, autobiographies, oral histories, ethnographies, photographs–and their relation to experience, identity, politics, and social change. (3 credits) CRN 6185

UENV 2000 Environment and Society
Timon McPhearson
Tuesday and Thursday – 10:00 – 11:20AM

The state of the air, water, and soil climate change, habitat conversion, invasive species, biodiversity decline, deforestation, overfishing, and many other environmental issues are at the core of most of our pressing economic, social, political and human health concerns. This course examines the roots of the modern environmental crisis, reviewing the most current environmental issues and the underlying science for a critical look at how societies have interacted with the natural environment past and present and requirements for a sustainable future. The course consists of small group discussions, readings and case studies. (3 credits) CRN 4733

ULEC 2020 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Teresa Ghilarducci
Tuesday – 10:15 – 11:30AM

This course introduces macroeconomic theory in economics, and analyzes how the ‘economy in the aggregate’ behaves. It focuses on how production, employment and prices are determined in advanced industrial capitalist nations, and explores how these macroeconomic variables determine economic prosperity of a nation over the long run (growth), and what happens when they fluctuate in an unexpected manner (leading to economic crisis). The course is divided in four parts. Part 1 examines how aggregate economy is measured in terms of output, income and employment, and examines the interrelationship between these variables. Part 2 focuses on the issues of aggregate production, and analyzes the process of growth and economic prosperity of a nation. Part 3 focuses on the issues of aggregate exchange and the role of money, and analyzes how aggregate prices are determined in the market. Part 4 focuses on the issues of international trade and globalization. Here we also touch upon the macroeconomic policies in developing nations. In the final part of the course, part 5, the issue of economic downturn and crisis is studied. The theory is examined in the light of the economic crisis of 2008-09 that plagued USA in particular, and the world economy in general. (3 credits) CRN 5701

 

Cluster 1 Electives: People, Places, Encounters (PPE)

LEDU 2107 International Comparative Education
Alec Gershberg
Wednesday – 9:00 – 11:40AM

This course explores contemporary issues in comparative education from an international perspective. Nations view education as an important factor in both individual and societal development and comparative inquiry prompts a deeper examination of the tensions among society, development, and education and the role of citizens in the educative process. The course examines multidisciplinary frameworks and methodologies, and multiple dimensions (scientific, pragmatic, and global) shaping contemporary debates about education, particularly at the intersection of the global and the local. The impact of contemporary processes of globalization are central to the course, creating a forum for critically exploring the theoretical and historical significance of colonialism and nationalism with respect to global educational development. Topics include: the changing nature of educational governance in the context of the nation state and globalization, teacher identity, curriculum and education, educational access and opportunity, and the role and function of international institutions and NGOs in education development. (4 credits) 7310

LANT 2030 Anthropology of Middle East
Professor TBA
Monday and Wednesday — 11:55 – 1:35PM

Since the 19th century and especially after the Sykes-Picot agreement of 1916, the Middle East has been sought after by Western scholars, armies and entrepreneurs. These U.S. and European imperial projects have not, however, gone unchallenged, often leading to characterizations of the region as violent and volatile. This course introduces students to the cultures and politics of the Middle East by focusing on how its peoples have interacted with and opposed epistemological regimes, military occupations, and political-economic systems. By examining a variety of cases ranging from labor unrest in Saudi Arabia’s oil fields, to the Palestinian uprising against Israeli occupation, to women’s piety movements in Egypt, we will investigate the myriad techniques used to control the region and the equally prolific ways in which they have been resisted. One of the main objectives of the course is to give students the necessary historical context and analytic tools for understanding and interpreting the current wave of uprisings and revolts. The reading will be primarily ethnographic, historical and literary and will include work by Edward Said, Timothy Mitchell, Rashid Khalidi, Ted Swedenburg, Joseph Massad, Eyal Weizman, Saba Mahmood, Julia Elyachar, Robert Vitalis, Abdul Rahman Munif, Elias Khoury, Lisa Wedeen and Zachary Lockman. Since the 19th century and especially after the Sykes-Picot agreement of 1916, the Middle East has been sought after by Western scholars, armies and entrepreneurs. These U.S. and European imperial projects have not, however, gone unchallenged, often leading to characterizations of the region as violent and volatile. This course introduces students to the cultures and politics of the Middle East by focusing on how its peoples have interacted with and opposed epistemological regimes, military occupations, and political-economic systems. By examining a variety of cases ranging from labor unrest in Saudi Arabia’s oil fields, to the Palestinian uprising against Israeli occupation, to women’s piety movements in Egypt, we will investigate the myriad techniques used to control the region and the equally prolific ways in which they have been resisted. One of the main objectives of the course is to give students the necessary historical context and analytic tools for understanding and interpreting the current wave of uprisings and revolts. The reading will be primarily ethnographic, historical and literary and will include work by Edward Said, Timothy Mitchell, Rashid Khalidi, Ted Swedenburg, Joseph Massad, Eyal Weizman, Saba Mahmood, Julia Elyachar, Robert Vitalis, Abdul Rahman Munif, Elias Khoury, Lisa Wedeen and Zachary Lockman. (4 credits) CRN 7151

LANT 2100 Postcolonial Africa
Janet Roitman
Tuesday and Thursday – 10:00 – 11:40AM

Postcolonial Africa is typically represented as a marginal place in the world: a place of disorder and war. How does anthropology help us to consider Africa’s place in our world? Do anthropological accounts of postcolonial Africa confirm that it is a place of chaos and violence? Or does anthropology allow us to better understand how we came to think about Africa as prone to violence and marginality? This seminar will consider these questions. We will examine some of the key concepts and debates that are central to the anthropology of postcolonial Africa with an aim to developing a critical perspective on representations of this vast continent and the diversity of practices that make Africa more than a continent. The seminar will take a thematic approach, covering topics such as kinship and ethnicity, religion and witchcraft, and economics and globalization. We will use both ethnographies and novels as the basis for discussion and debate. (4 credits) CRN 7152

LARS 2870 Himalayan Art and Culture
Adam Swart
Friday – 3:50 – 6:30PM

This course introduces students to aspects of the rich artistic and cultural heritages of Nepal and Tibet. More specifically, the Newars who are the indigenous inhabitants of Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley and an ethno-linguistic community known for their skill and mastery in numerous artistic media. This course focuses on the role that these Newar artists played in shaping the artistic and cultural identity of their homeland, for millennia an important crossroads and epicenter of culture, religion, artistic production, and trade. This course also emphasizes the legendary artistic legacy and influence that itinerant Newar artists brought with them to Tibet and the crucial role these Newar artists had in shaping the visual and artistic presence in Central Tibet. Through observation, visual analysis, research, and critical thinking, students learn to distinguish works of art based on their aesthetic style, art historical time period, and religious context. This course includes several field trips to the Rubin Museum of (Himalayan) Art. (4 credits) CRN 4414

LCST 3411 Trans(gender) Cult Studies
Theresa Cowan
Tuesday and Thursday – 11:55 – 1:55PM

Trans(gender) Cultural Studies will provide students with an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Trans- Studies, through an exploration of key theoretical texts, activist histories and archives and a wide range of expressive cultures including film and video, performance, spoken-word, memoir, blogging and other “new media.” This course will consider the ways in which Trans- Studies draws from and builds upon queer and feminist, critical race and anti-colonial theory, but also aims to study the ways that the unique histories and politics of transgender and transsexual people have been obscured within these broader fields. Furthermore, the course will be framed by a consideration of the ways that we might “critically trans- cultural studies”: that is, what does Trans- Studies bring to Cultural Studies? Shifting from a focus on identity politics to a practice of assemblage and allied critique, this seminar will take up the work of theorists, cultural producers and activists including Susan Stryker, Kate Bornstein, Jay Prosser, Sandy Stone, Dean Spade, Patrick Califia-Rice, Bobby Noble, Viviane Namaste, Trish Salah, Eli Clare, Justin Vivian Bond, Mira Soleil Ross, the Transformation Cabaret, Mangos with Chili, Viva Ruiz, Emi Koyama, Katastrophe, Erin Lindsey and Nina Arsenault. (4 credits) CRN 7254

LEDU 3216 Education and Development in Africa
Naomi Moland
Tuesday and Thursday – 11:55 – 1:35PM

This course will examine education as a social institution in Africa during three time periods. First, we will look at how colonists used education to promote “civilization” and to create a class of Africans who could serve as administrators in their governments. We will compare British, French, Belgian, and Portuguese colonial education policy, and see how these policies influenced development and social structures across Africa. Secondly, we will examine education in the immediate post-colonial period, as leaders of new nations used schools to promote national consciousness and economic growth. Finally, we will study current issues in education across Africa. We will consider how the push for universal education threatens to compromise educational quality, and investigate how privatization may be allowing governments to neglect their education sectors. In addition to examining the continuing role of the international community in African education, we will also study examples of countries attempting to “re-indigenize” their curriculum and pedagogical techniques. Throughout the course, we will follow five case studies—South Africa, Nigeria, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mozambique, and Senegal—in order to observe the influences of particular socio-historical contexts on these nations’ education system. (4 credits) CRN 7621

LHIS 2034 Inventing Latin America
Luis Alberto Herran Avila
Monday and Wednesday – 1:50 – 3:30PM

What is Latin America, and how do we make sense of its history? This course is both an introduction to the region and an exploration of core topics pertaining to 19th and 20th century Latin American politics, culture and society. We will draw on the processes of nation and state making after independence, the legacies of colonial rule and the struggles for citizenship; the insertion of Latin America in the world economy and the role of U.S. interventionism in the region; the cycles of revolution, authoritarianism and democratization during the 20th century; the emergence of new social movements during neo liberal hegemony; and the recent rise of the “New Left.” (4 credits) CRN 7172

LHIS 3031 Middle East History and Society
Neguin Yavari
Monday and Wednesday – 11:55AM – 1:35PM

This seminar is an interdisciplinary survey of major themes in Middle Eastern history, focusing on the role of myths, rhetoric, and propaganda in politics. Its multidisciplinary approach incorporates texts from a wide range of fields and disciplines: art, politics, religion, history, philosophy, and literature. Focusing on primary sources, the course charts cultural trends in their various facets and their interaction form their very inception to the present day, as seen and interpreted by writes and artists themselves. From sacred biographies and Sufi books on everyday conduct to modern literature and the cinema, the rich mosaic of artistic and religious experiences of the Middle East are explored to deepen our understanding of what it meant to be a Muslim and what shaped the Muslim experience over the past centuries. Literature, cinema and popular culture will be studied as ways of understanding the contemporary issues faced by these Muslim societies. How has culture been used to create, express, or legitimate political power? And conversely, how have word and images been used to underwrite criticism and dissent? How does the past define the contemporary dilemmas of the Middle East, and how does Islam function as ideology? We will also be reading from the works of poets and novelists who lived in Palestine and then Israel in the twentieth century. (4 credits) CRN 4914

LLSL 2214 South Asian Diaspora Literature
Robin Mookerjee
Monday and Wednesday – 3:50 – 5:30PM

This course considers writers of South Asian descent who live in North America and the UK and write in English. Diverse and individualistic, these writers have nonetheless forged a rich literary tradition with a distinctive set of concerns. These novels foresee and document the complexities of an emerging multipolar world. Their characters contend with a split sense of loyalty, tradition, and personal identity. Such divisions are mirrored in the layered writing styles for which these authors have won acclaim. Students read a representative selection including works by Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy, and V.S. Naipual. Participants should be prepared to read analytically and compose lucid works of criticism. (4 credits) CRN 7180

LMUS 3031 Music of Latin America
Dean Reynolds
Tuesday and Thursday – 10:00 – 11:40AM

This course explores the music of Latin America and the essential role that it plays in the lives of those who make it and listen to it. Topics might include Afro-Cuban music, Brazilian samba, Mexican son, the music of the Andes, and transnational popular genres like salsa, cumbia, and reggaeton. Through conceptual frameworks like race, gender, nationalism, diaspora, and globalization, this course seeks to investigate how music connects people across time and space throughout the Americas. New York City, a global capital of Latin American music, provides the context for various projects. No previous background in music is required, but a willingness to engage with fundamentals of music is expected. (4 credits) CRN 7328

LPOL 3016 Borders and Walls
Jessica Pisano
Tuesday and Thursday – 1:50 – 3:30PM

What are borders, and why do states police them? What are the politics that generate beliefs that we need borders? How are barriers between states constructed, and who are the actors that participate in their construction? And how, where, and why do people negotiate state boundaries? In this course, we analyze not only physical borders, but also bureaucratic barriers to movement and walls in virtual space. A lot of research about politics focuses on what happens within individual states or an international state system. But borderlands–physical or virtual–often have their own politics distinct from those of the states on whose peripheries they exist. In the course we emphasize research that seeks to understand politics in contexts that transcend the boundaries of states. Through a variety of case studies drawn from different continents, we consider the local political economies borders generate, and the ways people find to move around and across them. We also examine questions such as: how do walls made by authoritarian regimes differ from walls built by countries considered to be democracies? Finally, we consider how the study of borders and walls can change how we think about politics within states.
(4 credits) CRN 7263

LREL 2035 Everyday Religion in India
Georgina Drew
Tuesday and Thursday – 3:50 – 5:30PM

India is home to an array of religious traditions that have influenced one another over millennia. Although it is often associated with Hinduism, India counts among its citizens millions of Buddhists, Christians, Jains, Muslims, Sikhs, Zoroastrians, and people of many other faiths. The scope of this religiosity raises questions: In a secular, democratic, market-oriented, and increasingly “modern” state, how important are India’s religions to daily life? Is religion a central feature of everyday practice or just one of many guides that people draw upon in their quests for meaning, survival and fulfillment? This course engages India as a field of inquiry for understanding how religion is in dialogue with dynamic social relationships, economic struggles, ecological constraints, and governance structures, focusing on the experiences of ordinary people in their everyday lives. Course materials and assignments engage what people actually do rather than what they are supposed to do in idealized contexts of pure fidelity to religious teachings, establishing the significance of daily life in all its messy, syncretic, and seemingly contradictory richness in ways that are illuminating for both religious and area studies. (4 credits) CRN 7382

LREL 2075 World Christianity
Sara Winter
Monday and Wednesday – 10:55AM – 1:35PM

Diversity has been a feature of Christianity from its inception, when the disciples of Jesus argued among themselves over who was carrying on the true legacy of their teacher. This course has a dual focus on the diversity of contemporary Christianity and on the historical factors that have shaped it. Students study the context of the historical Jesus in Judaism and principal texts from each period including the New Testament. Topics include early forms of Christianity in the Mediterranean region, Asia, and Africa (including the Christological controversies, early exchange with China via the Silk Road and Christianity in the Quran), the Reformation and Counter-reformation, Christianity and European colonialism, Liberation Theology, and the Ecumenical movement. The scope of the course allows students to choose research topics according to their own interests. (4 credits) CRN 4389

LSOC 3070 Collective Memory and Political Identity
Monday and Wednesday 1:50 – 3:30PM
Professor TBA

Description not available at this time. (4 credits) CRN 7569

NFDS 3400 Food Culture in the Mediterranean
Fabio Parasecoli
Monday – 4:00 – 5:50PM

Students learn about Mediterranean food traditions and culture, particularly those of Italy and southern France, from historical, political, and economic as well as culinary perspectives. The class explores the historical development and contemporary worldwide diffusion of the Mediterranean diet; regional food production and distribution; dishes and ingredients; and changing patterns of food consumption, their connections with tradition, and the impact of globalization. (3 credits) CRN 6795

LEDU 2017 International Comparative Education
Alec Gershberg
Thirsdays – 12:10 – 2:50PM

This course explores contemporary issues in comparative education from an international perspective. Nations view education as an important factor in both individual and societal development and comparative inquiry prompts a deeper examination of the tensions among society, development, and education and the role of citizens in the educative process. The course examines multidisciplinary frameworks and methodologies, and multiple dimensions (scientific, pragmatic, and global) shaping contemporary debates about education, particularly at the intersection of the global and the local. The impact of contemporary processes of globalization are central to the course, creating a forum for critically exploring the theoretical and historical significance of colonialism and nationalism with respect to global educational development. Topics include: the changing nature of educational governance in the context of the nation state and globalization, teacher identity, curriculum and education, educational access and opportunity, and the role and function of international institutions and NGOs in education development. (4 credits) CRN 7310

PGHT 5620 Globalization & Contemporary Art
Janet Kraynak
Thursdays – 1:00 – 2:50PM

“Globalism” has become a dominant topic of discussion in contemporary art: from exhibitions to the curator, institutions have been “globalized” and practices are no longer viewed through the lens of limited nationalist or cultural traditions. The subject of globalism, however, is as fraught as it is ubiquitous. On the one hand, it represents inclusiveness, in which the parameters of culture are expanded outside of a Eurocentric perspective. On the other hand, it is viewed in a far less benign light, as the larger processes of globalization‹political, economic, social and technological result in new forms of imperialism, or the destruction of the local and the specific, or an expansion of multinational capital. This course examines this dualism, approaching the globalism/globalization question in terms of a series of related, sometimes conflicting, models, theories, and historical events. Readings are broad in scope and interdisciplinary in nature, drawn from the fields of economics, political science, philosophy and literary studies, among others. (3 credits) CRN 6651

 

Cluster 2 Electives: Markets and States (MS)

LECO 3830 Development Economics
Sanjay Reddy
Tuesday and Thursday – 11:55AM – 1:35PM

Description not available at this time. (4 credits) CRN 7167

LHIS 3027 Global History of Disease
Laura Palermo
Monday and Wednesday – 1:50 – 3:30PM

This seminar focuses on the global history of disease and how and why it affected, and was affected by, different social and political contexts over time in Europe, Latin America and beyond. The course approaches disease from the double perspective of its basic scientific dimensions and its interactions with history and society. We will analyze different historical cases including the plague and its role in the Early Modern period; smallpox and the colonial encounters; influenza and World War I world; Sexually Transmitted disease and its politics from Guatemala to Alabama, the ‘”Nazi War on Cancer”; Disease and Poverty in the history of the Third World (tuberculosis, Cholera, Dengue fever, Malaria, Yellow Fever, “neglected” diseases) as well as the more recent cases of HIV/AIDS and Avian Flu. The seminar examines the different contextual genealogies of disease including issues of imperialism and the expansion of global capital; fascism and democracy in the Third World. The seminar deals with the relationship between the past, present and future of disease in a global context. (4 credits) CRN 7313

LECO 4505 World Political Economy
William Milberg
Thursday 6:00 – 7:50PM
Friday 4:00 – 5:50PM

This course brings economic theory and political theory to bear on the analysis of contemporary economic problems, including the Asian financial crisis, the stagnation of wages in the United States, the monetary union in Europe, and economic integration of the Americas. Other possible topics include migration and urbanization, trade and investment, nationalism and national class divisions, patterns of the world division of labor, the economics of race and gender, the globalization of capital, the changing role of the modern state, contemporary macro policy, financial instability, technological change, and business organization. Lectures by guests provide historical background and use case studies to analyze issues in political economy. (3 credits) CRN 4158

 

Cluster 3 Electives: Rights, Justice, Governance (RJG)

LCST 4032 Queering Activism
Jasmine Rault
Tuesday and Thursday – 1:50 – 3:30PM

The forms of “activism” that this course explores range from the collective acts, organizing movements, strategies and tactics to individual gestures and accidents, life-sustaining if ephemeral social lives and scenes, to the images, sounds and sometimes words that make up an archive and ongoing repertoire of queer creative resistance. Given this city’s rich history of activism at the intersections of sexual, racial, religious, national and class politics, we will begin by focusing on organizations, events and scenes in New York City and use this background to consider the forms of activism that hold sway in other national and international contexts. Working with the understanding that ‘queer activism’ is not necessarily or most importantly dedicated to sexuality, we will pursue questions such as, What does it mean (and what has it meant) to queer activism? What are the historical and contemporary relationships between ‘queer’ and ‘activism’? How have queer creative cultures contributed to activism? What can we learn about contemporary modes of activism by studying queer traces in archival collections? This course will involve several ‘field trips’ to archives, organizations and events to provide students with an understanding of the broad range of queer activisms necessitated by this city (and country) as well as a sense of how and where to grow this understanding through archival research. Finally, students will be expected to develop (collectively or individually) their own forms of queer creative resistance as a component of their final grade. (4 credits) CRN 7258

LPOL 3049 Politics of Violence
Ayse Banu Bargu
Tuesday and Thursday – 1:50 – 3:30PM

This course inquires into the relationship between politics and violence. It explores the centrality of violence to political power as articulated by early modern, modern, and contemporary political theorists. It investigates questions of individual and collective preservation, legality, legitimacy, and morality. It considers the implications of violent political action as a method of subjugation and resistance, as a logic of contestation, and as a form of self-expression by the dispossessed, drawing comparisons with non-violent resistance. It aims to distinguish between different forms of violence: crime, warfare, terrorism, revolutionary struggle, among others. The course focuses the theoretical discussion of violence on practices that are relevant to our political lives, such as capital punishment, torture, humanitarian war, and corporeal forms of resistance. Theorists include Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Marx, Arendt, Benjamin, Fanon, Sorel, Foucault, and Schmitt. ($ credits) CRN 7244 (4 credits) CRN 7244

NPHI 3288 Human Rights
Luiz Guzman
Wednesday – 8:00 – 9:50PM

Is there such a thing as an objective or universal point of view? On one hand, the history of Western philosophy can be viewed as a continuous search for a fixed point of view, for a perspective that reveals how things “really are,” under the rubric of foundationalism, universalism, or objectivism. On the other hand, many serious thinkers have attempted to relativize any postulation of an absolute perspective. In ethics, this debate has become impassioned in recent years, as reflected in the conflict between the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, pronounced by the United Nations in 1948, and the objections about the imposition of a particular value system on a pluralistic world. This course explores arguments raised by ethical relativists throughout the history of philosophy, from Sextus Empiricus to Nietzsche to Richard Rorty, in order to arrive at the contemporary debate over human rights with the appropriate theoretical tools. Students analyze the strengths and weaknesses of universalist and relativist perspectives in an attempt to answer the question: How can a coherent system of human rights be established in a world of diverse and sometimes contradictory social values? (3 credits) CRN 6828

 

Cluster 4 Electives: Urban, Media, Environment (UME)

UURB 2001 History of World Urbanism 2
Georgia Traganou
Monday – 9:00 – 11:40AM

This course begins by reviewing the emergence of the multilayered city as a complex urban design solution over the last 60 years to handle urban uncertainty and unpredictability. Four different urban ecologies are present in the contemporary city in different mixtures in different places around the world. Patches of the megalopolis, metropolis, and megacity are potentially everywhere, depending on the choices of local urban actors, their local and global opportunities, their connections and knowledge. Each urban ecology has its own dominant actors and patterns; together the four layers can form an urban composite, a multi-laminated and multi-centric structure, with gaps and voids within it. Students will learn how urban designers, working inside this three-dimensional matrix, have been creating innovative ways to connect old centers, fragments, nodes, voids and nets in new combinations. (3 credits) CRN 6125

LCST 2138 World Cinema
Silvia Vega-Llona
Tuesday and Thursday – 1:50 – 3:30PM

This course studies world cinema, initially understood as films of world-importance, not produced in and for Hollywood. Beginning with the pioneering work of French filmmakers, and highlighting German Expressionism of the early 1920s, as well as Russian montage cinema of the late 1920s, the focus shifts to Latin America (Mexico and Argentina) as well as China and Japan in the 1930s and 1940s. After WW II, the course will consider the different ‘new waves’ in Western Europe (Italian Neo-Realism, the French Nouvelle Vague, New German Cinema) and Eastern Europe (Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary). From the 1970s onwards, a politicized, anti- and post-colonial cinema emerges in parts of Latin America (Cuba, Argentina, Brazil) and Sub-Sahara Africa (Mali, Senegal, Ethiopia, Burkina Fasso), which also reflects the increasing importance of international film festivals for world cinema. The 1980s witness a strong presence of Asian films (from Taiwan, South Korea and Hong Kong), while the 1990s reflect the vitality of filmmaking in Mainland China, in Iran, as well as world-class directors in Spain and Mexico. With the arrival of digital media and the spread of globalized culture since the late 1990s, cinema everywhere has undergone such dramatic changes that the course will conclude with new definitions of what is meant by ‘world cinema’ today. Readings in film history and international film culture will be complemented by critical analysis of individual films. (4 credits) CRN 7248

LECO 3040 Environmental Economics
Unurjarhal Nyambuu
Tuesday and Thursday – 10:00 – 11:40AM

This course aims at equipping student with economic methods and tools necessary to analyze current environmental issues. It examines theoretical analysis with discussion of a broad range of topics in environmental and natural resource economics. This course presents methodological issues and evaluation of environmental policy. It discusses cause of environmental problems e.g. market failure, property rights, policy failures, and reviews the welfare economics concepts including economic efficiency and market in terms of benefits and costs. We will examine Neo-classical and Ecological views on sustainability. This course also covers particular issues of current interest such as promotion of clean energy, transition to a greener economy and its social dimensions with specific emphasis on green economy and its implications for labor markets. Topics such as an introduction to ecological economics, climate change, water and air pollution, resource depletion, externalities, the economic critique of growth, the potential for government failure, incentive-based regulations, and opportunities for sustainable development are examined. (4 credits) CRN 7489

LURB 2016 Consuming the City
Scott Salmon
Tuesday and Thursday – 3:50 – 5:30PM

This course offers a global perspective on the changing character of cities and the increasing importance that consumption and consumer culture plays in the construction of urban life. Consumption has become both a means and motor of social change; an active ingredient in the construction of space and place; and in constructing subjectivity and social selfhood. Cities are simultaneously being restructured as engines of consumption – providing the contexts in which goods and services are marketed, compared, purchased, used, and displayed – just as they are themselves increasingly being commodified and, in a very real sense, consumed. Increasingly, forms of spectacle have come to shape how cities are imagined and to influence their character and the practices through which we know them – from advertising and the selling of real estate, to popular music and youth cultures, to the regeneration of urban areas under the guise of the heritage and tourist industries. Using examples of cities such as New York, Sydney, Barcelona, Rio de Janeiro, Toronto, London, and Johannesburg this course explores how image and practice have become entangled in the mutual and dynamic relationship between urban development and consumption. (4 credits) CRN 7362

LURB 3010 Community Organizing
Laura Liu
Tuesday and Thursday – 1:50PM – 3:30PM

This course explores the theory and practice of community organizing with a focus on understanding and implementing critical qualitative methodologies. It examines theories of social action and political organizing and their relationship with political-economy and identity. It uses examples of place-based and community-based organizations and organizing to consider the relationship between space, place, scale, and activism. Research on anti-sweatshop activism serves as a primary case study. Students simultaneously examine the role of qualitative methodologies and community-based learning in the research on community-based organizing and in activism itself. They engage extensively in their own methodological research projects. (4 credits) CRN 7336

NHUM 3101 Global Images of Metropolitan Futures
Margarita Gutman
Monday – 6:00PM – 7:50PM

This course explores the way the urban future is envisaged by different disciplines in different locations: Buenos Aires, Mumbai (Bombay), New York, and Shanghai. The course looks at these cities from the perspectives of visual culture, architecture, urban planning, art history, geography, and other social sciences. It analyzes the patterns and complexity of the international flow of visual culture related to images of the future, their agency, conditions of dissemination, and interaction with local contexts. Studying cities on different continents, the course examines how globalization affects local images and visions and is in turn affected by them. Students compare images and ideas from different cities, evaluating the content and power of these diverse images of the future and the way they influence aspects of urban life, including the built environment, culture, society, and the economy. (3 credits) CRN 5616

NCOM 3012 Politics, Demo, and Media
David Fractenberg
Wednesday – 6:00 – 7:50PM

Politics, the media, and democracy variously complement and clash with one another in contemporary U.S. society. This course addresses the fate of reasoned discourse, the crux of democracy, in light of the persistence of negative campaigning. Special attention is given to analysis of campaign speeches, appeals, and ads as mediated by television, radio, and print. How are the determinants of these private media compatible with and antithetical to the flourishing of a democratic system? We examine ideological controversies and claims and counterclaims of biased and inaccurate reporting of candidates’ positions and personal conduct. We analyze the rhetoric of landmark political speeches, appeals, and ads since the inception of television and assess the 2008 presidential campaign in terms of rhetorical strategies, the ethics of persuasion, and the nature of media coverage. (3 credits) CRN 5465

NCOM 3465 New Media: Global Equalizer
Melanie Beth Oliviero
Online Course

New information and communication technologies are transforming the most remote and disenfranchised communities in the world’s poorest countries. This course examines the use of new communications technologies in developing countries. How do these tools enable ordinary people in developing countries to give voice to their own stories? Can new media equalize participation and access to information for people heretofore bypassed by the benefits of globalization? Mobile phones, Internet kiosks, and satellite uplinks are being adopted and adapted by resourceful and creative users throughout the developing world. Through analytic studies, samples of new media, and direct engagement with some of the users themselves, the class explores how this connectivity, both technological and human, is transforming life in developing countries. From eyewitness reporting in societies as closed as Myanmar to community action in countries undergoing political upheaval such as Kenya to public health activities in Indonesia to joint problem solving by farmers, scientists, and policymakers half a world apart, new channels of communication and cross-cultural awareness are opening up within and beyond borders. (3 credits) CRN 4415

NFDS 3401 Food, Gender and Race in Media
Tomer Zeigerman
Online Course

This course examines how food-related representations establish, question, reinforce, reproduce, or overturn cultural assumptions about gender, race, and class relations. Students study the representation of food in media including advertisements, TV shows, cookbooks, travel brochures, magazines, blogs, and videos. Drawing on this critical analysis, the class identifies and discusses elements and themes connected with eating that shape the way gender and race are perceived, negotiated, and embodied in popular culture. (3 credits) CRN 5127

NFLM 3340 Political Cinema and the Other
Shimon Dotan
Online Course

In contemporary war, the Other is viewed not only as an enemy to be fought but often as one to be eliminated. How do filmmakers resist (or reinforce) such deadly representations? This class focuses on one of the world’s most conflict-ridden regions–the Middle East–but films from Russia, Germany, France, and the United States are also discussed. Through readings and assigned films, students learn how the Other is constructed in a film narrative, politically, aesthetically, and ethically. The course is designed for students interested in filmmaking and film criticism, contemporary politics and history (especially of the Middle East), and the cinema of conflict and violence and associated ethical questions. (3 credits) CRN 4419

NFLM 3418 Human Rights on Film
Karen Kramer
Tuesday – 6:00 – 7:50PM

At great personal risk, independent filmmakers around the globe capture human rights stories that are unlikely to appear on television. We discuss films dealing with teenage prostitution in Thailand, slave labor in the Caribbean, the rights of immigrants, and other important issues. We ask: What issues of human rights are raised in each film? Are they primarily race or gender issues? Do they involve war or dehumanization? What are the cultural implications of these human rights issues? Do outsiders have the right to interfere? Most important, how do the filmmakers use their craft and technique to tell the stories? Film screenings and discussions are supplemented by presentations by guest filmmakers, who take us behind the scenes. (3 credits) CRN 1529

PLVS 2001 The Design of Dissent
Janet Levy
Thursday – 9:00 – 11:40AM

Graphic design is an effective tool for rallying people to join political causes or raise their consciousness about social issues. The course analyzes the effectiveness of different strategies and various techniques found in historical and contemporary printed matter, films, websites, blogs and social networks. Examining the visual and verbal content of angry, bold, in-your-face graphics or the more subtle subversive dissent that uses humor and irony, we also consider if such graphics can successfully cross cultural and national boundaries. We study how branding and marketing techniques and the ethics of designing for governments, organizations or businesses that promote causes, work or do not work as a catalyst for change. As the voices of dissent continue to spread globally, understanding how communication design did and continues to impact society is more important than ever. Pathway: Visual Studies (3 credits) CRN 6341

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